Richmond, we need to do more

If you have not read about the latest UN assessment of human impact on the environment, it is your homework assignment for the weekend. The NYTimes review can be reached here:

Humans are Speeding Extinction and Altering the Natural World at an ‘Unprecedented’ Pace

The photo below will link you to the full report summary for the overachievers:

In short, not even considering Climate Change, humans are ruining habitats and driving plants and non-human animals toward extinction. In Richmond, we need to do more to create and preserve habitats for the species that have long called this place home.

The City of Richmond and it’s constituent parts (RRHA, etc.) control vast stretches of land in the city that for the most part are empty save for rusting structures, parking lots, and mowed weeds. Entire farms exist on less. Here’s a fine example near the East End landfill:

These properties need to be cultivated in a restorative way that creates habitat (food, shelter, water) for insects such as pollinators as well as birds, small land mammals, amphibians, and other native species. I recently visited a small town doing amazing things for its pollinators, this could easily be done in Richmond:

As the caretakers of the Falls of the James and the vast James River Parks System, Richmond should also look into improving this property as a habitat which might include planting more native flowering and fruiting plants, building structures for habitat, and working to limit the negative impact of human activity such as pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, and pollution. This includes the sewage that overflows into the river every time we have a hard rain.

As we consider our carbon footprint, we should evaluate ways to bring nature-friendly hydroelectric power generation back to our energy mix. I’ve been fascinated by small-scale generators such as Turbulent. Click the photo below for a video demonstration:

When you look at our city, essentially our human habitat, and compare it to a state or national park, it’s not hard to imagine the negative affect humans have had. We should require/incentivize every city block to include de-paved sections with native plantings for habitat, beauty, and the added benefit of water table recharge and less run-off in our sewer system.

We need to encourage more dense development to be sure we are fully utilizing our utilities (water, schools, emergency) as well as public transit. The denser development will ideally lead to cheaper cost of housing as supply increases and less distance that we all have to travel to get to work and recreation.

It’s overwhelming to read the research, but I’m convinced the best thing we can do is appreciate nature and do all we can to listen to what it needs. The answers will come to us as we go. For starters, I am personally working toward removing poison (insect, plant, rodent, etc.) from use and I believe as a city we need to find better ways to manage nature that don’t cause lasting and generic harm. I have planted a “mini-meadow” that I’ll be watching grow (and hopefully bloom) over the next few months. If this is successful, I’d love to plant little patches of wildflowers elsewhere in the city. Truth be told, it’s the first time I’ve planted from seed so I’m still a little skeptical, but it’s shaping up. I’d like to look into solar power, composting toilets, a greenhouse, wind turbines, electric razor scooter for commuting, and more. I’m limited by the cost and also questions about how things are regulated. I am ALWAYS taking in ideas and happy to hear that something can be done more efficiently.

We need to do more and we will also benefit from the beauty of nature, the health benefits of fresh food and an active lifestyle, and we can share our time with new friends we make along the way. If the pending environmental doom stresses you out, time in nature might just fix that too.

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